Ergonomists

Ergonomics (also known as human factors) is an applied science focused on designing and arranging furniture, equipment and systems so as to optimise people’s efficiency and wellbeing.

 
What do ergonomists do?
 
Ergonomics (also known as human factors) is an applied science focused on designing and arranging furniture, equipment and systems so as to optimise people’s efficiency and wellbeing. An ergonomic approach to the workplace is concerned with the interaction between people and their working environment. For example, a workstation set up according to ergonomic principles will be comfortable and convenient to use, thereby helping to maximise productivity and minimise the risk of injury.
 
Specialisation
 
Practising ergonomists must have a broad understanding of the full scope of the discipline, taking into account the physical, cognitive, social, organisational, environmental and other relevant factors.
 
Ergonomists often work in particular economic sectors or application domains. These application domains are not mutually exclusive and they evolve constantly. New ones are created; old ones take on new perspectives.
 
Physical ergonomics
 
Physical ergonomics is concerned with human anatomical, anthropometric, physiological and biomechanical characteristics as they relate to physical activity. The relevant topics include working postures, materials handling, repetitive movements, work-related musculoskeletal disorders, workplace layout, safety and health.
 
Cognitive ergonomics
 
Cognitive ergonomics is concerned with mental processes, such as perception, memory, reasoning, and motor response, as they affect interactions among humans and other elements of a system. The relevant topics include mental workload, decision-making, skilled performance, human-computer interaction, human reliability, work stress and training as these may relate to human-system design.
 
Organisational ergonomics
 
Organisational ergonomics is concerned with the optimisation of sociotechnical systems, including their organisational structures, policies, and processes. The relevant topics include communication, crew resource management, work design, design of working times, teamwork, participatory design, community ergonomics, cooperative work, new work paradigms, organisational culture, virtual organisations, telework, and quality management.
 
What if I need an ergonomist?
 
The Human Factors & Ergonomics Society of Australia Inc has hundreds of members drawn from many disciplines including work health and safety, design, architecture, engineering, medicine and psychology.
 

Secretariat Human Factors and Ergonomics Society of Australia Inc.
Suite 18
Hills Corporate Centre
11-13 Brookhollow Avenue
Baulkham Hills NSW 2153
Ph: (02) 9680 9026
Email: secretariat@ergonomics.org.au
Website: www.ergonomics.org.au

[Last updated 5 June 2018]

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